Eric Bogatin

Eric Bogatin

Eric Bogatin is the Technical Editor at Signal Integrity Journal and the Dean of the Teledyne LeCroy Signal Integrity Academy. Additionally, he is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder in the ECEE Dept. Eric improves the signal to noise ratio by sorting through all of the information available and finding the best quality content to publish on signalintegrityjournal.com.

ARTICLES

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Build Your Own Low-Cost Power Rail Probe

Probing signals with a bandwidth below 100 MHz and voltage sensitivity above 100 mV is a no-brainer. Regardless of the type of signal or the source impedance, the venerable 10x passive probe is the answer. However, at bandwidths >100 MHz and with voltage sensitivity <100 mV, the 10x passive probe may not be the best option. In this article, SIJ technical editor Eric Bogatin introduces an easy-to-implement, low-cost alternative to the 10x passive probe specifically for power-rail measurements.


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A Simple Demonstration of Where Return Current Flows

This simple measurement demonstrates the most important principle in SI/PI and EMI: that the return current will flow in the path of lowest resistance below about 10 kHz. But above about 10 kHz, the return current will begin to redistribute in the return path to be adjacent to the signal conductor. Read on to learn more.


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Seriously Funny Science Worth Watching

The Ig Noble Prizes are awarded every year for an individual or group who “did something that makes people laugh and then think.” In our time of increased stress what a perfect combination of activities for engineers to participate and experience: laughing and thinking.


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How to Reduce Attenuation in a Differential Channel

The attenuation in a uniform differential pair has two root causes: conductor loss and dielectric loss. By understanding how design decisions affect these two fundamental root causes, we can develop a few simple guiding principles which point us in the right directions to reduce the attenuation of a channel. These are the directions to follow when loss is important. In some cases, increasing the differential impedance will decrease loss, and in some cases it will increase the loss. Read on to see why.


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Use a 2D Field Solver to Accurately Predict Characteristic Impedance

The first goal in any high-speed board stack up design is to engineer interconnects with a target impedance, and the first step in this process is to use a 2D field solver to explore design space with a virtual prototype. Just how well can a field solver predict the impedance of traces on a real board? This article aims to answer this question.


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