Blog Postings

Nuggets from New Orleans

One reason I enjoy attending a conference is the opportunity to browse presentations I would not ordinarily see. I always pick up something new and useful. Here are some from my recent visit to the IEEE EMC Symposium.


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Young Professionals Placed in Jeopardy at 2019 EMC Symposium

On the first day of the 2019 IEEE EMC Symposium, Louann Mlekodaj, Eriko Yamato, Patrick DeRoy and other members of the EMC YP committee organized a Jeopardy game for the Young Professionals Group. As fitting the format of the Jeopardy show at an EMC event, answer categories covered, of course, EMC, SI and PI topics. Read on to test yourself!


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Making a Steamy, Hairy Golf Ball

My friend Steve Sandler pointed out a major hurdle we face in power distribution design: power engineers (who design power converters) and power integrity engineers (who design system bypassing-decoupling networks) use different vocabulary, techniques, and requirements. To understand a little better how we got here, I want to start with a prediction I heard sometime in the early 90s at one of the conference keynote speeches: “In 10 to 20 years, computers will look like hairy steamy golf balls.” 


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Imec Develops Method for Co-Integration of GaN Half-Bridge With Drivers to Boost Performance

At PCIM 2019 last month, imec announced a functional GaN half-bridge monolithically integrated with drivers. The release described how mounted on a buck-convertor test board, the chip converts an input voltage of 48 V to an output voltage of 1 V, with a pulse width modulation signal of 1 MHz. The achievement leverages on imec’s GaN-on-SOI and GaN-on-QST® technology platforms, reducing parasitic inductance and boosting commutation speed.


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Test Your TDR with a DMM

A TDR (time domain reflectometer) is an instrument that probably has the fastest rise time of any instrument in your lab, but how accurate is it? Eric tests accuracy using a DC Ohmmeter in this piece.


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Coming Up: Easier Signal Integrity Simulation Setup with IBIS 7.0

There was a time when the signal integrity of connections between digital ICs could be nearly ensured by following one simple rule: don’t connect more than some maximum number of input pins to any single output pin. Often the fanout limit would be around 7. No models, no simulations. Everything we needed was in the thick books of vendor datasheets that filled our shelves, the tree-killing viral precursor to AOL installation CDs. Ah, those were the days!


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